Northern Tablelands LLS joins forces with Landcare to protect songbird

With less than 400 estimated to survive in the wild, Northern Tablelands Local Land Services are inviting nature lovers to learn more about the striking Regent Honeyeater, and how to help them survive.

The Northern Tablelands is considered significant in the conservation of this critically endangered songbird, as breeding pairs regularly establish nests in our region.

Northern Tablelands LLS are joining with four Landcare networks to run a five year project designed to protect the songbird across the region; including Glen Innes Natural Resources Advisory Committee (GLENRAC), Granite Borders Landcare Committee (Tenterfield), Southern New England Landcare SNEL (Armidale), and Gwydir Macintyre Resource Advisory Committee (GWYMAC, Inverell).

Less than 400 Regent Honeyeaters are thought to live in the wild, and the Northern Tablelands is considered significant in the survival of this species.

Less than 400 Regent Honeyeaters are thought to live in the wild, and the Northern Tablelands is considered significant in the survival of this species.

'Turning the Tide on Threatened Species - Regent Honeyeater', which is in its first year, is funded by the federal government's National Landcare program.

The project aims to address threats to the birds and improve both the scope and quality of their habitat. It also seeks to gain the support of the entire community and raise awareness of the critically endangered species.

Key activities to improve Regent Honeyeaters' habitat in the region will include fencing, re-vegetation, weed control, pest animal control, honeybee management, thinning and community education.

Turning the Tide will use community and formal bird surveys to monitor the habitat and increase understanding of the size, structure and population trends of wild Regent Honeyeaters.

ANU researchers were thrilled to find a breeding group on a roadside stock route in Kings Plains National Park, close to the Severn River in 2016.

ANU researchers were thrilled to find a breeding group on a roadside stock route in Kings Plains National Park, close to the Severn River in 2016.

To increase community awareness, there will be a number of community education activities such as bird watching, farm planning and planting events.

To take part in the project, residents are invited to join a Regent Honeyeater focus group through their local Landcare Network.

Landcare contact details

  • Armidale: Northern Tablelands Local Land Services - (02) 6770 2000, Southern New England Landcare (SNEL) - (02) 6772 9123
  • Tenterfield: Granite Borders Landcare Committee (GBLC) - (02) 6736 3500
  • Glen Innes: Glen Innes Natural Resources Advisory Committee (GLENRAC) - (02) 6732 3443
  • Inverell: Gwydir Macintyre Resource Advisory Committee (GWYMAC) (02) 6721 1241
This story Learn how to protect the critically endangered Regent Honeyeater first appeared on Glen Innes Examiner.

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