Rotary Trivia Night 2019 | PHOTOS

Rotary's annual trivia night is turning into a highlight of the annual calendar with the Tenterfield Golf Club again packed with those out for a fun night, while helping to keep young drivers safe on the road.

Quizmaster John Tapscott put up a challenging set of questions, presented by master-of-ceremonies Terry Kneipp. Rotary Club president Skye Stapleton even suggested they may aim for a slightly less-challenging set of questions next year, although this didn't sit well with all participants.

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How many questions your table gets correct is only part of the appeal of the evening, although there certainly a level of competitiveness. (Disclaimer: yours truly was on winning Table 11. Although it was a team effort, thanks to Neil Rhodes and Robyn Murray for the heavy lifting).

The night was more about having fun with a variety of non-cerebral activities also on offer, including designing and flying a paper plane the greatest distance (Kane and Coby Roots won that one, after Dennis Gascoigne was disqualified for throwing a screwed-up ball of paper), a stand-up version of heads-and-tails (kudos, Julie Ware) and even just sitting in the right spot (which apparently was the chair next to mine).

Raffles and an auction of donated items contributed more to the coffers, the highlight being a framed shirt worn by tennis great Roger Federer, which was knocked down to Chris Jones for $1000.

The trivia night has been raising thousands of dollars each year for the past 14 years to help educate young drivers at Tenterfield High School. Teacher Peter Woodrow has been behind the project all that time, taking year 11 students to the Tamworth Youth Driver Expo each year and, more recently, then up to Willowbank Raceway for the practical component of the exercise.

He said the money the school receives from the trivia night is really life-saving.

"This is the most important excursion they will ever go on at school."

He said it's a big deal for our country kids to get access to this driver education that their city counterparts may take for granted.

"It's about changing kids' lives."

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