Make It Tenterfield recieve almost $60,000 from state government

Tenterfield Shire Mayor Peter Petty, left, Minister for Western NSW Adam Marshall and Make It Tenterfields Ruth Rutherford celebrate a $59,203 State Government grant.
Tenterfield Shire Mayor Peter Petty, left, Minister for Western NSW Adam Marshall and Make It Tenterfields Ruth Rutherford celebrate a $59,203 State Government grant.

TENTERFIELD'S young, creative minds will be given the opportunity to develop their artistic talents through a series of local workshops.

They are going ahead after Make It Tenterfield recieved almost $60,000 from the state government and organiser Ruth Rutherford said the workshops were targeted at Tenterfield's young people, who have not been spared the recent hardship.

"We have such a wealth of creative talent in Tenterfield and I think these workshops will be an important outlet for young people to express themselves, network and forget about the difficulties of the past two years," Ms Rutherford said.

"Each workshop will be delivered by a local facilitator and will have the capacity for 10 to 12 attendees.

"We operate out of a space above Mitre 10 which was kindly given to our group for free for two years, allowing us to grow and weather the current hard times," she said

Ms Rutherford said COVID-19 restrictions will dictate when these workshops can be started, but she said they were keen to have them up and running by mid-June and to have all 14 workshops completed by May next year.

"There is nothing more therapeutic than creating something with your hands. Some of the skills we aim to teach are unique and not in common use these days and I hope we are able to create joy through the hand made," she said.

Make It Tenterfield has been operating for just over a year.

The $59,203 state government was announced by state government minister Adam Marshall, who said the not-for-profit organisation had played an important role in strengthening community wellbeing and social inclusion.

"While most people in our region have experienced the effects of drought and bushfire over the past eighteen months, few have put up with it as long as the residents of Tenterfield," Mr Marshall said.

"Tenterfield's first bushfires started in February 2019 and since then it has been disaster on disaster, with fires in September entering the township at the same time it's water supply was about to run dry."

He said workshops at Make It Tenterfield have helped residents, both young and old, relieve the emotional stress associated with these events

"Once COVID-19 restrictions have been eased, this grant will allow Make It Tenterfield to hold fourteen artistic workshops, building skills in jewellery making, painting, tie-dying and paper sculptures.

"I think this is a very worthwhile initiative which will greatly support the emotional wellbeing of Tenterfield's most important asset - it's young people," he said