School holiday 'rona tips... are we there yet?

RDAA President, Dr John Hall: "COVID-19 could spread quickly throughout rural Australia if people arent careful in how and where they go."

RDAA President, Dr John Hall: "COVID-19 could spread quickly throughout rural Australia if people arent careful in how and where they go."

No we aren't, according to the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA).

With a COVID-19 flare in Melbourne, people are being cautioned to limit travel throughout rural Australia over the school holidays.

RDAA President, Dr John Hall, said that COVID-19 could spread quickly throughout rural Australia if people aren't careful in how and where they go.

"We are definitely not there yet when it comes to a safe return to pre-COVID travel," Dr Hall said.

"We have a lot of rural areas that haven't seen any cases of coronavirus, and it is important that they remain as protected as possible.

"The spike in cases in Melbourne shows us that we need to stay vigilant, particularly over the school holidays when people are keen to get out and about with their kids.

"As always, maintain your 1.5m distance and keep washing your hands.

"If you are traveling, minimise the contact you have in towns you pass through, and stay careful with your personal hygiene routine.

"Also, now is not the time to visit remote Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander communities - save that for a non-COVID year," Dr Hall said.

"Once you have arrived at your destination, please remember to limit the sizes of gatherings; don't cosy up with your 10 neighbours in the one caravan for wine and cheese - do it outside and BYO drinks and food.

"Kids will be kids and will play and hang out with their friends, so make sure they wash their hands when they are finished and keep them eating with their own family.

"It's important to remember that you can still have fun, but do it safely and keep thinking of minimising the risks."

Remembering to be careful after returning home from any travel is also a very important part of keeping the rest of the community safe, particularly the vulnerable population.

"If you've been away, it is probably best not to rock up to visit your elderly parents or grandparents in the first week back.

"Stay away for two weeks, to allow the incubation period to pass and if you have any symptoms... any at all! Get a COVID test," Dr Hall said.

"Maintain your handwashing and distance, and keep an eye on all the family for any cold or flu symptoms, coughs, fevers or runny nose, and if you see even a hint of them, get tested.

"We want everyone to be able to enjoy their break as safely as possible, and to keep protecting our vulnerable populations from the virus."