Tenterfield High School students get the Goodfella treatment

Tenterfield High School's student support officer Roberta Koch, Goodfellas presenter Jack Ellis and teacher Toby Fibbins, with some enthusiastic students participating in the myth-busting program.
Tenterfield High School's student support officer Roberta Koch, Goodfellas presenter Jack Ellis and teacher Toby Fibbins, with some enthusiastic students participating in the myth-busting program.

Goodfellas, the myth busting program for boys (not the movie), came to Tenterfield High School on Tuesday June 4.

The Goodfellas workshop debunked the most common and damaging myths about boys in a engaging, funny, positive way, building up skills that allow boys to move beyond stereotypes.

The myths busted include that there's nothing the individual can do about violence against women, that real men have six-packs and don't cry, that all gamers are geeks and that boys hate learning.

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The day's activities also included a leadership workshop looking at the concept of male leadership and what it takes to be a leader. It was again an informative thought-provoking and fun workshop that challenged stereotypes and gave all boys a chance to shine.

The structured activities ran over one school day as part of the school's student wellbeing program. Presented by Jack Ellis on behalf of Enlighten Education, the Goodfellas program was made possible by a grant from the Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR). The grant resulted from a joint application by Tenterfield High School and Tenterfield Social Development Committee (TSDC).

"We are thrilled that we have been able to work in partnership with TSDC to support the wellbeing of our boys, and are grateful to FRRR for funding the program," the school's student support officer Roberta Koch said.

Mr Ellis -- who has a background as a drama teacher, artist and actor -- connected immediately with the students and kept them engaged and active throughout the day as, together, they 'busted' myth after myth about boys and men and their behaviour, expectations and attitudes.

"It is important to support our boys to grow into young men who are confident, assured and respectful of women," school principal Sandra Rosner said.

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